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Teaching negotiations
by Dr. Piotr Jednaszewski

- 3

NO QUESTION TAGS

Just a few words - why not to use such forms as: We agreed on that, didn`t we?

BUT: We agreed on that, yes?

Teaching grammar and negotiations do not always mean the same. The variety of different cultures and language level of negotiators indicates that we should always use safe forms, that is the forms to which the answer is exactly as expected. Simplifying that, what would the negotiator say after putting the question:

We agreed on that, didn`t we?

And having the answer: Yes, we did. or Did we

as in many cultures regardless of understanding, confirming and nodding is the form of showing the respect to the other party.

Developing understanding

Another vital question is how to train and develop understanding of the scope and complexity of the message delivered by the other party. It seems trivial when the message delivered by the other party is relatively small, such as: It was good to have your contract draft delivered before your arrival.

Trivial as we get the message: GOOD / HAVE CONTRACT / BEFORE YOUR ARRIVAL

But what happens if the listener gets a longer message: Mr. Yamamoto and Mr. Toshiko appreciate having the contract delivered due to your visit as we had the opportunity to go through the vital points and reanalyze within our teams some feasible solutions, applicable when agreed during our talks unless other alternative were presented.

Here managers get the mixture and understanding depends on how much of that information was logically simplified and linked in the receiver`s mind.

This ability is can be trained through working first with written and then aural texts. this can be done by marking the core issues as presented below, and then retelling what is understood:

Mr. Yamamoto and Mr. Toshiko appreciate having the contract delivered due to your visit as we had the opportunity to go through the vital points and reanalyze within our teams some feasible solutions applicable when agreed during our talks unless other alternative were presented.

Cutting the long story short a trained mind gets the message:

THEY / APPRECIATE / CONTRACT /before VISIT / OPPORTUNITY / TEAMS REANALYZED VITAL POINTS for SOLUTIONS / OR (unless) ALTERNATIVE.

Such exercises should be practiced again and again and again. The words and phrases can be remembered as symbols, words, logical patterns, personal visualization. We should teach how to pick up and join ideas whereas students should chose the best alternative, code for their mind as some prefer more abstract, picture-based linking, whereas others more mathematical formulas. However practice makes perfect.

Summarizing the linguistic aspect of negotiations we should remember that:

Simplicity and appropriate questions are the key to being well understood whereas understanding the others needs to be practiced through different types of simplified visualizations. In other words we are able to teach our students how to control the talks while controlling our mind and the mind works in symbols.

Biodata

Piotr Jednaszewski is a methodologist, graduated with degrees: Doctor of Philosophy, TEFL, American University of London Master of Art in Education and Professional Development (Teaching English as a Foreign Language), University of East Anglia Master in Science in Engineering, Post Graduate Diploma in Management and Marketing, Post Graduate Diploma in Education and Professional Development. For 10 years he has been language counselor, proofreader and has been preparing managerial staff for international talks.

Piotr

English teacher: - preparing for negotiations, business plans and projects presentations - English for Banking - English for Lawyers - General English - preparing for University of Cambridge exams From 1992 Director of Diplomat Colleges in Poland
email: st_university@hoga.pl

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