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Reading tasks for logical-mathematical
language learners
by Rolf Palmberg
- 3

References

Berman, M. (2008). “The Way of the Kabbalist”. http://www.hltmag.co.uk/jan08/sart01.doc.
Blom, L., P. Linnankylä & S. Takala (1988): Tekstien avaaminen luokassa. Jyväskylän yliopisto. Kasvatustieteiden tutkimuslaitoksen julkaisusarja B. Teoriaa ja käytäntöä.
Britten, N. (1983). “Reactive Reading”. Practical English Teaching 3:3 (34-35).
Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind. The theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic Books.
Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences. The theory in practice. New York: Basic Books.
Grant, N. (1987). Making the most of your Textbook. London & New York: Longman.
Mortimer, C. (1980). Dramatic Monologues for Listening Comprehension. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Palmberg, R. (2009a). “The Greek T-shirt - facts vs. assumptions”. http://edition.tefl.net/ideas/reading-ideas/greek-t-shirt/.
Palmberg, R. (2009b). Activities and exercises for logical-mathematical learners of English. Karperö 2009: Palmsoft Publications. http://www.vasa.abo.fi/users/rpalmber/.
Palmberg, R. & O. Palmqvist (1988). ”Varying text revision”. Practical English Teaching 8:3 (35-36).

Biodata

Rolf Palmberg is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Teacher Education at Åbo Akademi University in Vaasa, Finland, where he has taught EFL methodology since 1979. His publications comprise a number of books and papers mainly in the fields of applied linguistics and EFL methodology.
Rolf
He is also the author of a range of CALL programs and Java applets, available at: http://www.vasa.abo.fi/users/rpalmber/download.htm His non-academic interests include geographical enclaves and tripoints.

APPENDIX 1

THE WINDOW

Two men, both seriously ill, occupied the same hospital room. One man was allowed to sit up in his bed for an hour each afternoon to help drain the fluid from his lungs. His bed was next to the room’s only window. The other man had to spend all his time flat on his back. The men talked for hours on end. They spoke of their wives and families, their homes, their jobs. And every afternoon when the man in the bed by the window could sit up, he would pass the time by describing to his roommate all the things he could see outside the window. [D]

The man in the other bed began to live for those one-hour periods where his world would be broadened and enlivened by all the activity and colour of the world outside. The window overlooked a park with a lovely lake. Ducks and swans played on the water while children sailed their model boats. Young lovers walked arm in arm amidst flowers of every colour of the rainbow. Grand old trees graced the landscape, and a fine view of the city skyline could be seen in the distance. [A]

As the man by the window described all this in exquisite detail, the man on the other side of the room would close his eyes and imagine the picturesque scene. One warm afternoon the man by the window described a parade passing by. Although the other man couldn’t hear the band – he could see it in his mind's eye as the gentleman by the window portrayed it with descriptive words. Then unexpectedly, a sinister thought entered his mind. Why should the other man alone experience all the pleasures of seeing everything while he himself never got to see anything? It didn't seem fair. [F]

At first thought the man felt ashamed. But as the days passed and he missed seeing more sights, his envy eroded into resentment and soon turned him sour. He began to brood and he found himself unable to sleep. He should be by that window - that thought, and only that thought now controlled his life. [B]

Late one night as he lay staring at the ceiling, the man by the window began to cough. He was choking on the fluid in his lungs. The other man watched in the dimly lit room as the struggling man by the window groped for the button to call for help. [E]

Listening from across the room he never moved, never pushed his own button which would have brought the nurse running in. In less than five minutes the coughing and choking stopped, along with that the sound of breathing. Now there was only silence - deathly silence. [C]

The following morning the day nurse arrived to bring water for their baths. When she found the lifeless body of the man by the window, she was saddened and called the hospital attendants to take it away. As soon as it seemed appropriate, the other man asked if he could be moved next to the window. The nurse was happy to make the switch, and after making sure he was comfortable, she left him alone. Slowly, painfully, he propped himself up on one elbow to take his first look at the world outside. Finally, he would have the joy of seeing it all himself. He strained to slowly turn to look out the window beside the bed. [G]

It faced a blank wall! The man asked the nurse what could have compelled his deceased roommate who had described such wonderful things outside this window. The nurse responded that the man was blind and could not even see the wall. She said, ‘Perhaps he just wanted to encourage you’.

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