Developing Teachers.com
A web site for the developing language teacher

Models and samples as a resource for writing
by Greg Gobel
- 9

Board 1, Stage 1

the situation:

    • a famous American actor goes to Japan to make advertisements
    • he’s meeting his Japanese hosts at the hotel

Note: An area at the bottom of the board will be reserved for emerging collocations/ expressions and vocabulary

Board 2, Stage 4

Avoiding cultural gaffes

Topics:

  • greetings
  • restaurants
  • transportation
  • clothing/attire
  • at someone’s home
  • (other ideas from students)

Note: An area at the bottom of the board will be reserved for emerging collocations/ expressions and vocabulary

Board 3, Stage 7

Avoiding cultural gaffes

Topics: Useful Language:

  • greetings It would be a good idea to…
  • restaurants Here are some suggestions to…
  • transportation Here are some helpful hints …
  • clothing/attire …is an essential feature of life in…
  • at someone’s home It is important to consider …
  • (other ideas from students) The following is a list of …

Traditionally … These days …

Historically … Nowadays …

When + V ing

Note: An area at the bottom of the board will be reserved for emerging collocations/ expressions and vocabulary

Info Sheet activities

Read the advice for writing an information sheet. Decide if you SHOULD do each or if you SHOULDN’T. Write ‘DO’ or ‘DON’T’.

Do or Don’t

   
 

1.

Use section headings.

 

2.

Use bullet point lists.

 

3.

Think of a title for your sheet that will provoke the reader’s interest.

 

4.

Avoid a conclusion. It’s not necessary for an information sheet.

 

5.

Avoid writing an introduction. This isn’t necessary either.

 

6.

Provide illustrations.

 

 

 

Now, with a partner, discuss why you should or shouldn’t do these things.

Read the advice for writing an information sheet. Decide if you SHOULD do each or if you SHOULDN’T. Write ‘DO’ or ‘DON’T’.

Do or Don’t

   
 

1.

Use section headings.

 

2.

Use bullet point lists.

 

3.

Think of a title for your sheet that will provoke the reader’s interest.

 

4.

Avoid a conclusion. It’s not necessary for an information sheet.

 

5.

Avoid writing an introduction. This isn’t necessary either.

 

6.

Provide illustrations.

 

 

 

Now, with a partner, discuss why you should or shouldn’t do these things.

***************

Here are some questions to consider when you are planning your information sheet. Please discuss them with your partner. Jot down notes here to help.

1. What title will you give your information sheet so as to make it interesting and attractive to your audience?

2. How many sections will you have in your information sheet and what headings will you use for each one?

3. Will you need to use a more formal or informal style with the audience you are writing for?

4. What is the purpose of your information sheet?

Answer: to inform, warn and advise

- How will this affect the language you use? (Remember, you don’t want to put visitors off coming to your country!)

5. How will you introduce the topics you cover in each section? (Remember, you don’t want to make your customs and values seem illogical to visitors.)

‘Suggested Answers’ from the teacher’s book.

Now, compare your ideas with the suggested answers from my teacher’s book.

1. (possible titles) ‘How to be the “perfect visitor”’ or ‘Etiquette tips for travellers’.

2. Five or six; and introduction and conclusion plus sections for each of the three or four areas.

3. Relatively formal and polite as the visitors could be any age and the subject matter is slightly delicate.

4. It will be necessary to use a lot of modal verbs to soften what is expressed in the sheet. For example, ‘people might be offended’ ratherthan ‘people get offended’. Not too much ‘ You should/shouldn’t/must/mustn’t’. Alternate with ‘You can… You needn’t/don’t have to…’. Use a variety of expressions and language so that it doesn’t seem repetitive.

5. With a brief explanation of the reason for the custom.

‘Suggested Answers’ from the teacher’s book.

Now, compare your ideas with the suggested answers from my teacher’s book.

1. (possible titles) ‘How to be the “perfect visitor”’ or ‘Etiquette tips for ravellers’.

2. Five or six; and introduction and conclusion plus sections for each of the three or four areas.

3. Relatively formal and polite as the visitors could be any age and the subject matter is slightly delicate.

4. It will be necessary to use a lot of modal verbs to soften what is expressed in the sheet. For example, ‘people might be offended’ rather than ‘people get offended’. Not too much ‘ You should/shouldn’t/must/mustn’t’. Alternate with ‘You can… You needn’t/don’t have to…’. Use a variety of expressions and language so that it doesn’t seem repetitive.

5. With a brief explanation of the reason for the custom.

Print-friendly version

To the articles index

Back to the top


Tips & Newsletter Sign up —  Current Tip —  Past Tips 
Train with us Online Development Courses    Lesson Plan Index
 Phonology — Articles Books  LinksContact
Advertising — Web Hosting — Front page


Copyright 2000-2016© Developing Teachers.com