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Frankenstein
- a CAE error awareness
lesson plan
by Gregory Gobel
- 3

Frankenstein

Frankenstein Reading Lesson Procedure

Stage

Time

Procedure

Aims

1

10 minutes

1A. Learners correct mistakes in sentences that are on the walls. Each sentence contains one typical mistake that might be on the CAE Paper 3, Part 3. Each sentence is taken from the novel, Frankenstein.

  • Interaction pattern: Closed pairs, standing and walking around the room; teacher monitoring to give clues such as ‘spelling in this one’ or ‘yes, it’s punctuation, but not commas here.’
  • Classroom aids: 10 sentence strips attached with blue tack to the walls, tape recorder, tape of a song called Frankenstein
  • Time: 7 minutes

1B. Feedback to the mistakes from 1A

  • Interaction pattern: Lockstep
  • Classroom aids: Handout with the sentences from the walls to make following along in feedback easier
  • Time: 3 minutes

Movement around room for brain oxygenation and increasing learners’ energy and to vary the dynamic.

Use of extracts from the novel for authenticity.

Mistakes are purposefully chosen to reflect the CAE exam.

Pairwork for learners to help each other, to increase achievability of the task.

Feedback for closure to the task and to make sure everyone is ready for stage 2.

2

5 minutes

2A. Learners use the same sentences on handout from stage 1B to generalize types of mistakes CAE Paper 3, Part 3 looks for filling in the chart at the bottom.

  • Interaction pattern: Closed pairs; teacher monitors to make sure learners are categorizing correctly and to help with possible unknown terminology such as ‘homophone’, ‘silent letter’, etc.
  • Classroom aids: Handout from stage 1B
  • Time: 3 minutes

2B. Feeback to generalizing task.

  • Interaction pattern: Lockstep
  • Whiteboard, Board pens (see Board 1 below)
  • Time: 2 minutes

To sensitize learners to the types of mistakes in the CAE English in Use Part 3 task.

Pairwork for learners to help each other, to increase achievability of the task.

Feedback for closure to the task and to bring class back together to naturally lead into 3A.

3

8 minutes

3A. Elicit from class that the source of the material is Frankenstein. If they do not know, teacher tells them. Elicit what learners know about Frankenstein.

  • Interaction pattern: Lockstep
  • Classroom aids: Visual of monster!
  • Time: 1-2 minutes

3B. Using the sentence on handout from 1B and a series of guided questions, learners gain a general understanding of the story of Frankenstein, mainly the monster’s history.

  • Interaction pattern: Closed pairs
  • Classroom aids: handout from 1B and handout with guided questions
  • Time: 5 minutes

3C. Feedback to task 3B. (Pacey)

  • Interaction pattern: lockstep
  • Classroom aids: handout from 1B and handout with guided questions
  • Time: 1-2 minutes

To find out what learners know about the theme of the lesson; to activate schemata.

To help set the scene, further activate schemata, and establish the context of the main extract used in stages 4,5,6,7.

Feedback for closure to task.

4

5 minutes

4A. Teachers introduces the main extract and reads exam strategy 1 to learners. (‘Read the text through to get the general idea.’)

  • Interaction pattern: Lockstep
  • Classroom aids: Teacher shows main extract to learners but does not handout yet.
  • Time: less than one minute

4B: Learners read main extract and do 4 gist questions that help them to ‘get the general idea’. Teacher tells learners not to correct the mistakes at this point.

  • Interaction pattern: Closed pairs; teacher monitoring throughout to prompt correction if learners answer incorrectly.
  • Classroom aids: Main extract handout
  • Time: 3-4 minutes

4C. Snappy feedback to the questions

  • Interaction pattern: Lockstep
  • Classroom aids: Main extract handout
  • Time: 1 minute

To help learners focus on their coursebook’s suggested exam strategies for this part of the exam.

Teacher does not hand out text in 4A so learners are not distracted by it.

Learners do gist questions for top-down reading.

Use of pairs so learners can help each other.

Feedback for closure to task.

5

4-5 minutes

(Optional stage; contingent upon time and/or need)

5A. Learners read main extract again and answer 5 more intensive questions.

  • Interaction pattern: closed pairs
  • Classroom aids: handout with questions
  • Time: 4 minutes

To further help learners understand the text.

‘How do you know?’ questions so learners ‘prove’ they understand their answer.

6

16-18 mins

6A. Teacher gives the next two suggested exam strategies to learners. These are:

  • ‘Read the text again. Read sentence by sentence to help you identify punctuation mistakes. Look at each word in turn to help you identify spelling mistakes.’
  • ‘When you have finished, check that no more than five lines are correct.’
  • Interaction pattern: Lockstep
  • Classroom aids: Whiteboard, board pen
  • Time: 1-2 minutes

6B. Learners do exam-style correction activity with the main extract, looking for mistakes, writing the corrections in the spaces provided, consulting with their partner as needed.

  • Interaction pattern: Closed pairs; teacher monitors closely to observe learners’ progress, encourage them, and prompt correction similarly as in stage 1.
  • Classroom aids: main extract
  • Time: 12-15 minutes (time here will be flexible, as much as learners need)

6C. Feedback to the task in 5B. Then, teacher will assign the homework assignment: Learners will transfer skills/strategies from the lesson to the correction activity on page 64.

  • Interaction pattern: lockstep
  • Classroom aids: board to write ‘page 64, correction activity’
  • Time: 2-3 minutes

To help learners focus on their coursebook’s suggested exam strategies for this part of the exam.

For learners to practice exam strategies and to practice identifying mistakes and correcting mistakes.

Use of extract from the novel for authenticity; to increase learners’ motivation for doing this sort of rather dry exam task.

Use of pairs to increase achievability -- especially important as the task is quite challenging.

Feedback for closure to the task and clarify any pending questions about the corrections.

7

5-7 minutes

7A. Learners work out the meaning of some of the literary language in the passage. Hints are folded over in case learners need some extra.

  • Interaction pattern: closed pairs
  • Classroom aids: main extract, literary language worksheet
  • Time: 4-5 minutes

7B. Feedback to task 7A.

  • Interaction pattern: small groups, combining pairs from previous activity for learner-centred feedback
  • Classroom aids: main extract, literary language worksheet
  • Time: 1-2 minutes

For learners to infer meaning of complex, somewhat dated literary language.

Pairs so learners can help each other.

The hints are available for learners to use if they have trouble working out the meaning so that the task starts out challenging but has a built in way to increase the achievability to prevent learners from getting frustrated.

8

8 minutes

(if time allows)

8A. Teacher explains a little about Victor Frankenstein.

  • Interaction pattern: lockstep
  • Classroom aids: none
  • Time: 1 minute

8B. Learners think about their role (contingent upon time). Learners will either discuss in pairs with a partner who has the same role; or the teacher will ask the whole class questions

  • Interaction pattern: closed pairs or lockstep
  • Classroom aids: none
  • Time: 2 minutes

8C. Learners perform a role play as the characters from the extracts: A=Victor, B=Monster. Communicative purpose: The monster’s task is to try to convince Victor to make him a female monster. Victor’s task is to decide based on his experiences and what the monster says.

  • Interaction pattern: closed pairs; role change/partner change if time allows.
  • Classroom aids: none (the roles and task will be verbally given instead of on role cards)
  • Time: 4-5 minutes, longer if time and learners engaged.

For learners to generate some ideas before doing the role play; thinking time/brainstorming time leading to more effective speaking.

For learners to manipulate the ideas from the texts in a contextualized role play.

To integrate speaking into a predominantly reading-focused lesson.

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