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Frankenstein
- a CAE error awareness
lesson plan
by Gregory Gobel
- 4

Frankenstein

Board 1 (note: created in stage 2; will be left up until end of stage 6)

Spelling Punctuation
Double letters Commas
Homophones Capital letters
Suffixes (-able/-ible; -ant/-ent) Brackets (parentheses)
Silent letters Full stops (periods)
  Inverted commas (quotation marks)
  Apostrophes

Board 2 (note: created in stages 4 and 5; will be left up until the end of stage 6)

Spelling Punctuation
Double letters Commas
Homophones Capital letters
Suffixes (-able/-ible; -ant/-ent) Brackets (parentheses)
Silent letters Full stops (periods)
  Inverted commas (quotation marks)
  Apostrophes


Exam Stategies:

1. Read for general idea

2. Sentences for punctuation; word by word for spelling

3. No more than 5 correct lines

Wall correction slips / Typical CAE spelling and punctuation mistakes (stages 1 & 2)

1. It is with considerable dificulty that I remember the original era of my being.

2. All the events of that period appear confused and, indistinct.

3. When I looked around I saw and herd of none like me.

4. The gentle words of Agatha and the animated smiles of the charming arabian were not for me.

5. The presence of Safie diffused happiness among its inhabitents.

6. My voice, although harsh,) had nothing terrible in it.

7. “Great God!” exclaimed the old man “Who are you?”

8. He struggled violently. Let me go,’ he cried; ‘monster! You ugly wretch! You wish to eat me and tear me to pieces.’

9. I am alone and miserable; man will not associate with me; but one as deformed and horrible as myself woud not deny herself to me.

Spelling Punctuation
   
   
   
   
   

Developing the story discussion prompt worksheet (stage 3)

Discuss these questions with your partner.

Look at sentences 1, 2, and 3:

  • Who is narrating these events?

  • How does he feel?

  • What do you know about his origin, his ‘birth’?

Look at statements 4, 5, 6, and 7 and consider this background information:

For a while, the monster watches a pleasant but sad family living in a country cottage. He helps them by chopping wood and bringing fruit, etc. The family doesn’t know the monster is there, but are extremely thankful for the gifts.

  • How does he feel about them?

  • What does he want to do?

  • The old man in the cottage is blind. Why do you think he gets scared?

Consider this background information:

After the depressing experience of being rejected by the family, the monster leaves and goes to Geneva to hunt down his creator, Victor Frankenstein. He camps out in a woods near Geneva. A young boy finds him. Coincidentally, the boy is the Victor Frankenstein’s brother!

  • Now, look at 8. What is happening? What do you think the monster does?

Look at sentence 9.

  • Who do you think the monster is talking to?


Spelling and punctuation correction worksheet (stage 4, 5 & 6)

extract from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1818)

The being finished speaking and fixed his looks, upon me in the

expectation of a reply. But I was bewildered, perplexed, and unable

to arrange my ideas suficiently to understand the full extent of his

proposition. He continued ‘You must create a female for me with

whom I can live in the interchange of those sympathies neccessary

for my being. This you alone can do, and I demand it of you as a

write which you must not refuse to concede.’

The latter part of his tale had kindled anew in me the anger, that

had died away while he narrated his peacful life among the cottagers,

and as he said this I could no longer suppress the rage that burned

within me.

‘I do refuse,’ I replyed; ‘and no torture shall ever extort a

consent from me. You may render me the most miserible of men,

but you shall never make me base (in my own eyes. Shall I create

another like yourself, whose joint wickedness might desolate the

world? Begone! I have ansered you; you torture me, but I

will never consent.’

‘You are in the wrong, replied the fiend; ‘and instead of threatening,

I am content to reason with you. I am malicious because I am

miserable.

Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind?’


In most lines of the text, there is either a spelling or punctuation mistake. For each numbered line 1-16, find the errors and correct them. Five lines are correct. Indicate these with a tick ( 3 ). The exercise begins with three examples (0), (00) and (000).

0 looks upon (no comma)

00 OK

000 sufficiently (double ‘f’)

1 _____________

2 _____________

3 _____________

4 _____________

5 _____________

6 _____________

7 _____________

8 _____________

9 _____________

10 ____________

11 ____________

12 ____________

13 ____________

14 ____________

15 ____________

16 ____________


Literary language worksheet (stage 7)

Working out the meaning of literary language.

Find the following words or phrases in the text and discuss what they might mean.

1. (line 00-1). What is one adjective that summarizes this: ‘ I was bewildered, perplexed, and unable to arrange my ideas sufficiently to understand the full extent of his proposition’ ?

2. (line 2): What does the monster mean by ‘ the interchange of those sympathies necessary for my being’ ?

3. (line 5): What do you think ‘had kindled anew in me the anger’ means?

4. (line 12): What does ‘Begone!’ mean?

Hints if needed:

1. the word begins with a ‘c’

2. humans are social creatures

3. kindling is small dry sticks or other material used to start fires

4. separate ‘Begone’ into two words


Optional detailed reading questions (stage 5)

Read the text again and answer these questions.

1. How many people can create the female monster? How do you know?

2. What emotion does Victor Frankenstein have? How do you know?

3. Does Victor accept the request of the monster? How do you know?

4. Is the monster physically violent toward Victor? How do you know?

5. Why has the monster been violent in the recent past? How do you know?

Read the text again and answer these questions.

1. How many people can create the female monster? How do you know?

2. What emotion does Victor Frankenstein have? How do you know?

3. Does Victor accept the request of the monster? How do you know?

4. Is the monster physically violent toward Victor? How do you know?

5. Why has the monster been violent in the recent past? How do you

now?

Gist questions worksheet (stage 4)

General ideas questions:

1. Who is the narrator of the story now?

2. What does the monster want and how does the narrator respond?

3. How does the monster want to resolve the problem?

4. How do we know that Frankenstein had some sympathy for the monster?


Exam strategies as suggested by Advanced Gold (back of gist reading worksheet)

Exam strategies for doing the spelling/punctuation correction activity

  • Read the text through to get the general idea.

  • Read the text again. Read sentence by sentence to help you identify punctuation mistakes. Look at each word in turn to help you identify spelling mistakes.

  • When you have finished, check that no more than five lines are correct.

Biodata

Greg Gobel lives in Madrid both teaching at Chester School of English and as a freelance teacher trainer. He has been an English language teacher since 1997 and a teacher training since 2000. After more than 7 years in Prague, he moved to Madrid in autumn, 2004. You can contact Greg at gobelgj@hotmail.com

Greg

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