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Material used in the Teaching Tip - Tolerance

Match up the flag & the description below.Then discuss with your partner which you think sums up the Day for Tolerance best.
1.The Spiritual Globe - Robert Rauschenberg
2.The Breath of Fraternity - Souleymane Keita
3. The Earth is Our Skin - Roberto Matta
4.The Balance of Life - Dan You
5.The Path of the Infinite - Rachid Koraichi
6.Harmony and Evolution - Friedensreich Hundertwasser
a. The Spiritual Globe - Robert Rauschenberg
With this flag, a global map in the form of hearts, Robert Rauschenberg, leader of contemporary American art, wanted to underline the spiritual dimension of tolerance. "The globe opens out and becomes a heart resembling the hands Michael Angelo painted on the ceiling of the Sixtine Chapel, which unite the creator to his creature. This heart asserts itself as a spiritual organ setting the tempo of life on earth," explains the artist, who was born in 1925 in the United States.
b. The Earth is Our Skin - Roberto Matta
"I christened one of my first paintings 'To Be With' in order to show my will for solidarity," Roberto Matta recalls. The painter, born in 1911 in Santiago, Chile, raises a cry of alarm : "The earth is threatened, love is threatened, poetry is threatened, art is threatened." And the painter makes an appeal : "Tolerance is the affirmation of the desire to live, to retrieve nature. You must love the earth above all else. It is truth and light. It is our skin.".
c. The Breath of Fraternity - Souleymane Keita
"This flag is the breath of fraternity that unites men who are mobilised by tolerance. It rises like blue music in a blue sky, the image of hope as this 20th century ends," says the African artist Souleymane Keita, who was born in 1947 in Gorée, Senegal. Like the flag he created, his painting adapts themes from his surroundings such as elements from nature, music, and spiritualism, integrating a variety of styles - abstractionism, figurative, impressionism.
d.Harmony and Evolution - Friedensreich Hundertwasser
"The figure expresses mankind, and the colour blue means hope; it is the sign of the development of humanity, an integral part of the universe," Friedensreich Hundertwasser, one of the leading figures of contemporary art, says of his flag. "Tolerance is an eternal value," emphasises the Austrian artist who was born in 1928 in Vienna. "We have entered the new age of tolerance, which has become an absolute necessity. This flag is a Treatise that implies the endless cycle of the renewal of life and of peace".
e. The Path of the Infinite - Rachid Koraichi
"Blue, a supraterrestrial colour, is the path of the infinite. It expresses detachment from the values of this world," says the Algerian artist Rachid Koraichi, who was born in 1947. "For an African, gold is the principle of solidity, of human security, the principle of happiness." The five-pointed star incarnates the human microcosm: "It shines in people's hearts, which are obscured by passions." Like a talisman, the checkerboard recalls the seven words of the Muslim profession of faith : seeking, love, knowledge, independence, unity, wonder, devotion.
f. The Balance of Life - Dan You
Dan You works on image concepts with Jean Michel Jarre, whose concert for tolerance was attended by 1.5 million persons on 14 July 1995 in Paris. His flag represents the four elements: "Air, fire, earth and water, the source of all being and beyond any dogmas," says the artist, who was born in 1958 in Saigon (Viet Nam). "The defined and infinite forms reflect the paradoxes of the Yin and Yang components of balance. Asia has found and will find the paths of tolerance within its extremes".

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Ten Ideas for Observing the International Day for Tolerance (16 November)

Match up the headings with the appropriate paragraph

1. Diversity in Your Community
2. Human Rights

3. Do-lt-Yourself Tolerance Program
4. No to Violence
5. Ecological Diversity and Human Diversity
6. Religious Tolerance
7. Current Events
8. Sports and Tolerance
9. Creativity at Work

10. International Link-ups
a. How does violence come into a community, school or home, and how can it be stopped? Act out the dynamics of tolerance and intolerance through role playing, dialogue, dilemma solving. Organise public debates, take sides in a debate, and then switch sides and speak for the opposite position. How do you imagine peaceful co-existence of diverse individuals and groups? What makes it work, and what undermines it?
b. Start an international conversation or school-pairing project, by mail or computer. Write to others in another country about issues and problems you face in your lives. Exchange audio cassettes or pictures. Explore the possibilities of participating in international summer camps or student exchanges. Ask your school to join UNESCO's Associated Schools Project.
c. Every community is based on interdependence. Like the plants and animals, we couldn't survive if we were all the same. What are some examples of this truth drawn from daily life in your town? What are concrete examples of how a culture of peace and tolerance can promote environmental preservation? Start a project in your school or neighbourhood.
d. Art speaks volumes. Examine the work of an artist from another region of the world. What does it communicate to you? Create short stories, plays, poems, songs, articles, paintings, posters, photographs, or videos elucidating the themes of tolerance, and publish or distribute them. Write letters to prominent people, asking questions and communicating your views on the subject of tolerance.
e. Wherever you live, the wide diversity of your community will probably surprise you. It has been said that a culture is the sum total of all the influences that a region has undergone. Undertake an investigative project on cultural diversity in your town or community. Who lives there? How do they live? Articles, interviews, posters or displays can be designed to highlight the range of identities and cultures. How is this diversity demonstrated in music? Reflect on the number of traditions of music and dance you've come across, and the mutual influences they show. Organise a concert or cultural festival that brings together a range of cultural traditions.
f. Organise an event, with the participation of different religious and non-religious groups in your community, to discuss how tolerance is taught by these communities. How is tolerance taught by the different religions of the world, including the traditions of indigenous peoples? Each of them, in its own way, is founded on love and justice, and cannot be used to justify violence or war. Dialogue and discussion between representatives of many religious groups is a tradition that goes back centuries, and is still valuable today.
g. How are the rights of persons belonging to national, ethnic, religious, linguistic or other minorities guaranteed in your community, nation, region? How about indigenous people, migrant workers, asylum-seekers and refugees, disabled people? Are their rights promoted and protected? Do you find that your law-enforcement officials are adequately educated about human rights? What can you do to improve attitudes or behaviour toward minorities?
h. Write your own tolerance curriculum or program. This means deciding what are the component parts of tolerance, and how you think tolerant values can best be transmitted. Scrutinise your text books and televisions, newspapers and magazines for stereotyping, including gender typing, and assumptions about nationalities and ethnic groups. What are the tolerance priorities for your town, country or region?
i. What are the international sporting events, and what is their purpose? What are the possible links between sports and intolerance (such as exclusion of those unable to compete, competitive chauvinism and violence) and how may these be remedied? Organise an athletic event around the theme of diversity and tolerance.
j. Organise discussions about current events in relation to tolerance and intolerance. Analyse actual conflicts of the past and present. How might they have been resolved or avoided? How is the issue of human rights in the news today? What are the fundamental rights and freedoms recognised by the international community? How do multi-cultural, multi-linguistic countries work? What are the common interests that diverse peoples share?

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